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People

Publications

  1. Marshall, K. E. & Baltzer, J. L. 2014 (in press). Decreased competitive interactions drive a reverse species richness latitudinal gradient in sub-Arctic forests. Ecology [ Link ]
  2. Marshall, K. E., & Sinclair, B. J. 2014 (in press). The relative importance of number, duration, and intensity of cold stress events in determining survival and energetics of an overwintering insect. Functional Ecology [ Link ]
  3. Marshall, K.E., Thomas, R. H., Roxin, Á., Chen, E. K.Y., Brown, J.C.L., Gillies, E. R., & Sinclair, B. J 2014. Seasonal accumulation of acetylated triacylglycerols by a freeze-tolerant insect. Journal of Experimental Biology. 217, 1580-1587 [ Link ]
  4. Sinclair, B.J., Stinziano, J.R., Williams, C. M., MacMillan, H.A., Marshall, K.E., and Storey, K.B 2013. Real-time measurement of metabolic rate during freezing and thawing of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica: Implications for overwinter energy use. Journal of Experimental Biology. 216, 292-302 [ Link ]
  5. Brown, J.C.L., Marshall, K.E., Fieldes, M.A. & Staples, J. F 2012. Differences in tissue concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in the roots and cotyledons of annual and perennial species of flax (Linum) and the mechanisms responsible. Botany. 90, 1015-1027 [ Link ]

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Katie Marshall

Killam Postdoctoral Fellow

Email:
Web page: Lab page
Research area: Comparative Physiology, Ecology
Supervisor: C. Harley
History: PhD University of Western Ontario
BSc (Hons) Acadia University

The long-term goal of my research is to understand how abiotic stress filters through physiology to shape species abundance and distribution. While abiotic stressors such as temperature have been used very successfully to predict population growth, distribution, and diversity of insect species, integration of the mechanisms of how these stressors are experienced by individuals from alteration of physiology through to fitness impacts has lagged. Inclusion of these mechanisms is crucial for accurate modelling predictions of individual (and therefore population-level) responses. My research to date has focused on how the impact of frequency of stress (rather than the duration or intensity of stress) is a superior predictor of both survival and reproductive success , and used insect cold tolerance as a model system.

At UBC I'll be focusing on the cold tolerance and cryobiology of invertebrates in the intertidal. These organisms face freezing stress through the winter, yet remarkably little is known about how they do so. I'll also be investigating plasticity in cold tolerance by looking for interactive effects of ocean acidification and community composition on thermal tolerance.

Last updated 10 November 2015