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People

Publications

  1. Eliason, E.J., S.M. Wilson, A.P. Farrell, S.J. Cooke, S.G. Hinch 2013. Low cardiac and aerobic scope in a coastal population of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka with a short upriver migration. Journal of Fish Biology 82: 2104-2112
  2. Eliason, E.J., T.D. Clark, S.G. Hinch, A.P. Farrell 2013. Cardiorespiratory collapse at high temperature in swimming adult sockeye salmon. Conservation Physiology 1: doi:10.1093/conphys/cot008
  3. Eliason, E.J., T.D. Clark, S.G. Hinch, A.P. Farrell 2013. Cardiorespiratory performance and blood chemistry during swimming and recovery in different populations of adult sockeye salmon. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology A 166: 385-397
  4. Wilson, S. M., S. G. Hinch, E. J. Eliason, A. P. Farrell, S. J. Cooke 2013. Calibrating acoustic acceleration transmitters for estimating energy use by wild adult Pacific salmon. Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry A 164: 491-498
  5. Cooke, S.J., S.G. Hinch, M.R. Donaldson, T.D. Clark, E.J. Eliason, G.T. Crossin, G.D. Raby, K.M. Jeffries, M. Lapointe, K. Miller, D.A. Patterson, A.P. Farrell 2012. Conservation physiology in practice: How physiological knowledge has improved our ability to sustainably manage Pacific salmon during up-river migration. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 367: 1757-1769

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Erika Eliason

PhD

Email:
Web page: Lab page
Research area: Comparative Physiology
Supervisors: T. Farrell, S. Hinch
History: B.Sc Simon Fraser University, 2003
M.Sc University of British Columbia, 2006
Ph.D University of British Columbia, 2011

**NOTE: I am now a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Sydney**

All animals have an optimum temperature, which in part sets their geographical distribution. My PhD research examined this phenomenon across populations of adult sockeye salmon. The genetically discrete and high fidelity spawning populations of Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada, adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) provide an excellent model to examine temperature optima at an intraspecific level because different populations encounter widely different river temperatures (8-22 degree C), hydraulic challenges (2,000-10,000 m^3/s), migration distances (100-1200 km) and elevation (10-1200 m) during their adult river migration. We hypothesized that each sockeye salmon population has locally adapted through natural selection to meet their unique environmental challenges. I examined this hypothesis across many levels of biological organisation: whole animal swimming and cardiorespiratory performance, organ performance, gross organ morphology, ultrastructure and receptors.

Awards

2012

Cameron Award

For Research

Best PhD thesis in Zoology in Canada, Canadian Society of Zoologists

2012

Faculty of Science Graduate Prize - PhD

For Research

2011

Peter A. Larkin Award

For Research

Canadian Aquatic Resources Section, American Fisheries Society

2011

NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship

For Research

2010

Best Student Oral Presentation

For Research

International Congress on the Biology of Fish

2010

Hoar Award

For Research

Best Student Presentation, Canadian Society of Zoologists Annual General Meeting

2009

UBC Four Year Fellowship for PhD students

For Research

2009

McLean Fraser Summer Research Scholarship

For Research

2007

NSERC Postgraduate Scholarship

For Research

2006

Pacific Salmon Forum Grant

For Research

2006

UBC Department of Zoology Graduate Entrance Award

For Research

2006

UBC Faculty of Science Achievement Award for Service

For Service

2004

SFU Graduate Fellowship (declined)

For Research

Last updated 2 January 2013