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People

Publications

  1. Amundrud, S. L., and Srivastava, D. S 2016. Trophic interactions determine the effects of drought on an aquatic ecosystem. Ecology 97: 1475–1483 [ Link ]
  2. Amundrud, S. L., and Srivastava, D. S 2016. Phytotelm bromeliads as model systems to study ecosystem responses to environmental stress. Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America 97: 403-405 [ Link ]
  3. Amundrud, S. L., and Srivastava, D. S 2015. Drought sensitivity predicts habitat size sensitivity in an aquatic ecosystem. Ecology 96: 1957-1965 [ Link ]
  4. Amundrud, S. L., Srivastava, D. S., and O'Connor, M. I 2015. Indirect effects of predators control herbivore richness and abundance in a benthic eelgrass (Zostera marina) mesograzer community. Journal of Animal Ecology 84: 1092-1102 [ Link ]
  5. Chen, Y., Amundrud, S. L., and Srivastava, D. S 2014. Spatial variance in soil microarthropod communities: niche, neutrality or stochasticity?. EcoScience 21 (3-4): 405-418 [ Link ]

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Sarah Amundrud

PhD Candidate

Email:
Research area: Ecology
Supervisor: D. Srivastava
History: MSc, BSc-Honours (University of British Columbia)

Research on ecological effects of climate change has traditionally focused on direct, physiological effects on species; however, we are beginning to recognize its potential to alter ecological communities and ecosystem processes indirectly, by affecting species interactions. Foundation and keystone species exert particularly strong effect on communities, and thus present a high potential to mediate ecological effects of climate change. In Monteverde, Costa Rica, water-filled bromeliads provide habitats (i.e. are foundation species) for diverse invertebrate food webs and occur along a climate (elevation) gradient. The keystone predator (damselfly-larvae) is absent from bromeliads in the relatively cool and wet high elevation bromeliads. Thus, these miniature ecosystems are ideal systems to examine the relative importance of direct and indirect ecological effects of climate change. I am combining observational, experimental, and modeling techniques to tease apart which factors best explain community composition: climate; habitat; or predators. Moreover, I use modeling techniques to predict community and ecosystem changes under future climate scenarios.

Awards

2016

NSERC Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement (CGS-MSFSS)

For Research

2016

Killam Doctoral Scholarship

For Research

2016

GoGlobal Self-Directed Research Award

For Research

2016

NSERC CGS-D

For Research

2015

UBC Four Year Doctoral Fellowship

For Research

2015

BRITE Internship Award

For Research

2015

Best M.Sc. Thesis in Zoology Prize (UBC)

2014

BRITE Graduate Fellowship

For Research

2013

Zoology Travel Award

For Research

2012

McLean Fraser Memorial Scholarship

For Research

Last updated 28 May 2016